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New Model Of Oropharyngeal and Gastrointestinal Colonization by Candida albicans

New Model Of Oropharyngeal and Gastrointestinal

Colonization by Candida albicans


AMY M. FLATTERY, GEORGE K. ABRUZZO, CHARLES J. GILL, JEFFREY G. SMITH,

AND KEN BARTIZAL


"Although Candida albicans is present in many mammals including humans, normal bacterial flora and various immune factors usually restrict the growth of C. albicans in the alimentary tracts of immune competent hosts. Infection of the alimentary tract mucosae, including the mucosae of the oropharynx, esophagus, and gastrointestinal tract, with C. albicans is occurring with greater frequency, presumably because of the increased population of immune compromised individuals. Recent evidence suggests that cell-mediated immunity, and more specifically, CD41 T lymphocytes, play an important role in resistance to mucosal candidiasis. Patient populations with AIDS or other defects in cellular immune function show an increased incidence of mucocutaneous, but not necessarily disseminated, candidiasis, whereas patients with phagocytic cell defects, such as those that occur in patients with neutropenic or chronic granulomatous disease states, show a higher incidence of disseminated candidiasis. A combination of defective cell-mediated immunity and

phagocytic cell defects in athymic beige (bg/bg nu/nu) mice was found to predispose them to severe mucosal candidiasis with subsequent Candida dissemination. Existing mouse models of mucosal candidiasis use combinations of chemically induced immune

suppression, elimination or alteration of the host microflora by administration of antibiotics, high inocula, trauma, infant animals, or animals with congenital, functional, physiological, immunological, or metabolic defects to facilitate colonization of the gastrointestinal tract by C. albicans."

 

Full Article:

http://aac.asm.org/cgi/reprint/40/7/1604.pdf






Keywords: Oropharyngeal Gastrointestinal Colonization Candida albicans alimentary tract mucosae drjefftop advanced

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